Translations by Scott James Remnant (Canonical)

Scott James Remnant (Canonical) has submitted the following strings to this translation. Contributions are visually coded: currently used translations, unreviewed suggestions, rejected suggestions.

101150 of 161 results
267.
JOB is the name of the job that is to be sent the signal, this may be followed by zero or more environment variables to distinguish between job instances.
2010-02-05
JOB is the name of the job that is to be sent the signal, this may be followed by zero or more environment variables to distinguish between job instances.
268.
Query status of job.
2009-07-11
Query status of job.
269.
JOB is the name of the job that is to be queried, this may be followed by zero or more environment variables to distguish between job instances.
2009-07-11
JOB is the name of the job that is to be queried, this may be followed by zero or more environment variables to distguish between job instances.
270.
List known jobs.
2008-03-11
List known jobs.
271.
The known jobs and their current status will be output.
2009-07-11
The known jobs and their current status will be output.
272.
EVENT [KEY=VALUE]...
2009-07-11
EVENT [KEY=VALUE]...
273.
Emit an event.
2008-03-11
Emit an event.
274.
EVENT is the name of an event the init daemon should emit, this may be followed by zero or more environment variables to be included in the event.
2009-07-11
EVENT is the name of an event the init daemon should emit, this may be followed by zero or more environment variables to be included in the event.
275.
Reload the configuration of the init daemon.
2009-07-11
Reload the configuration of the init daemon.
276.
Request the version of the init daemon.
2008-03-11
Request the version of the init daemon.
277.
[PRIORITY]
2009-07-11
[PRIORITY]
279.
PRIORITY may be one of: `debug' (messages useful for debugging upstart are logged, equivalent to --debug on kernel command-line); `info' (messages about job goal and state changes, as well as event emissions are logged, equivalent to --verbose on the kernel command-line); `message' (informational and debugging messages are suppressed, the default); `warn' (ordinary messages are suppressed whilst still logging warnings and errors); `error' (only errors are logged, equivalent to --quiet on the kernel command-line) or `fatal' (only fatal errors are logged). Without arguments, this outputs the current log priority.
2009-07-11
PRIORITY may be one of: ‘debug’ (messages useful for debugging upstart are logged, equivalent to --debug on kernel command-line); ‘info’ (messages about job goal and state changes, as well as event emissions are logged, equivalent to --verbose on the kernel command-line); ‘message’ (informational and debugging messages are suppressed, the default); ‘warn’ (ordinary messages are suppressed whilst still logging warnings and errors); ‘error’ (only errors are logged, equivalent to --quiet on the kernel command-line) or ‘fatal’ (only fatal errors are logged). Without arguments, this outputs the current log priority.
308.
don't sync before reboot or halt
2008-03-11
don't sync before reboot or halt
309.
force reboot or halt, don't call shutdown(8)
2008-03-11
force reboot or halt, don't call shutdown(8)
310.
switch off the power when called as halt
2008-03-11
switch off the power when called as halt
311.
don't actually reboot or halt, just write wtmp record
2009-07-11
don't actually reboot or halt, just write wtmp record
312.
Halt the system.
2008-03-11
Halt the system.
313.
Power off the system.
2008-03-11
Power off the system.
314.
Reboot the system.
2008-03-11
Reboot the system.
315.
This command is intended to instruct the kernel to reboot or halt the system; when run without the -f option, or when in a system runlevel other than 0 or 6, it will actually execute /sbin/shutdown.
2009-07-11
This command is intended to instruct the kernel to reboot or halt the system; when run without the -f option, or when in a system runlevel other than 0 or 6, it will actually execute /sbin/shutdown.
317.
Calling shutdown
2008-03-11
Calling shutdown
318.
Unable to execute shutdown: %s
2008-03-11
Unable to execute shutdown: %s
319.
Rebooting
2008-03-11
Rebooting
320.
Halting
2008-03-11
Halting
321.
Powering off
2008-03-11
Powering off
323.
[UTMP]
2008-03-11
[UTMP]
324.
Output previous and current runlevel.
2008-03-11
Output previous and current runlevel.
325.
The system /var/run/utmp file is used unless the alternate file UTMP is given.
2009-07-11
The system /var/run/utmp file is used unless the alternate file UTMP is given.
326.
reboot after shutdown
2008-03-11
reboot after shutdown
327.
halt or power off after shutdown
2008-03-11
halt or power off after shutdown
328.
halt after shutdown (implies -h)
2008-03-11
halt after shutdown (implies -h)
329.
power off after shutdown (implies -h)
2008-03-11
power off after shutdown (implies -h)
330.
cancel a running shutdown
2008-03-11
cancel a running shutdown
331.
only send warnings, don't shutdown
2008-03-11
only send warnings, don't shutdown
332.
TIME [MESSAGE]
2008-03-11
TIME [MESSAGE]
333.
Bring the system down.
2008-03-11
Bring the system down.
334.
TIME may have different formats, the most common is simply the word 'now' which will bring the system down immediately. Other valid formats are +m, where m is the number of minutes to wait until shutting down and hh:mm which specifies the time on the 24hr clock. Logged in users are warned by a message sent to their terminal, you may include an optional MESSAGE included with this. Messages can be sent without actually bringing the system down by using the -k option. If TIME is given, the command will remain in the foreground until the shutdown occurs. It can be cancelled by Control-C, or by another user using the -c option. The system is brought down into maintenance (single-user) mode by default, you can change this with either the -r or -h option which specify a reboot or system halt respectively. The -h option can be further modified with -H or -P to specify whether to halt the system, or to power it off afterwards. The default is left up to the shutdown scripts.
2008-03-11
TIME may have different formats, the most common is simply the word ‘now’ which will bring the system down immediately. Other valid formats are +m, where m is the number of minutes to wait until shutting down and hh:mm which specifies the time on the 24hr clock. Logged in users are warned by a message sent to their terminal, you may include an optional MESSAGE included with this. Messages can be sent without actually bringing the system down by using the -k option. If TIME is given, the command will remain in the foreground until the shutdown occurs. It can be cancelled by Control-C, or by another user using the -c option. The system is brought down into maintenance (single-user) mode by default, you can change this with either the -r or -h option which specify a reboot or system halt respectively. The -h option can be further modified with -H or -P to specify whether to halt the system, or to power it off afterwards. The default is left up to the shutdown scripts.
335.
%s: time expected
2008-03-11
%s: time expected
336.
%s: illegal hour value
2008-03-11
%s: illegal hour value
337.
%s: illegal minute value
2008-03-11
%s: illegal minute value
338.
%s: illegal time value
2008-03-11
%s: illegal time value
339.
Shutdown is not running
2008-03-11
Shutdown is not running
340.
Another shutdown is already running
2008-03-11
Another shutdown is already running
341.
Cannot find pid of running shutdown
2008-03-11
Cannot find pid of running shutdown
342.
Unable to change directory
2009-07-11
Unable to change directory
343.
Unable to write pid file
2008-03-11
Unable to write pid file
344.
Shutdown cancelled
2008-03-11
Shutdown cancelled
345.
The system is going down for power off NOW!
2009-07-11
The system is going down for power off NOW!
346.
The system is going down for halt NOW!
2009-07-11
The system is going down for halt NOW!
347.
The system is going down for maintenance NOW!
2009-07-11
The system is going down for maintenance NOW!