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These translations are shared with GNU Mailman 2.1 series template mailman.

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840.
When a message is posted to the list, a series of
moderation steps are taken to decide whether a moderator must
first approve the message or not. This section contains the
controls for moderation of both member and non-member postings.

<p>Member postings are held for moderation if their
<b>moderation flag</b> is turned on. You can control whether
member postings are moderated by default or not.

<p>Non-member postings can be automatically
<a href="?VARHELP=privacy/sender/accept_these_nonmembers"
>accepted</a>,
<a href="?VARHELP=privacy/sender/hold_these_nonmembers">held for
moderation</a>,
<a href="?VARHELP=privacy/sender/reject_these_nonmembers"
>rejected</a> (bounced), or
<a href="?VARHELP=privacy/sender/discard_these_nonmembers"
>discarded</a>,
either individually or as a group. Any
posting from a non-member who is not explicitly accepted,
rejected, or discarded, will have their posting filtered by the
<a href="?VARHELP=privacy/sender/generic_nonmember_action">general
non-member rules</a>.

<p>In the text boxes below, add one address per line; start the
line with a ^ character to designate a <a href=
"http://docs.python.org/library/re.html"
>Python regular expression</a>. When entering backslashes, do so
as if you were using Python raw strings (i.e. you generally just
use a single backslash).

<p>Note that non-regexp matches are always done first.
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(no translation yet)
Located in Mailman/Gui/Privacy.py:180
901.
This setting determines the moderation policy of the
newsgroup and its interaction with the moderation policy of the
mailing list. This only applies to the newsgroup that you are
gatewaying <em>to</em>, so if you are only gatewaying from
Usenet, or the newsgroup you are gatewaying to is not moderated,
set this option to <em>None</em>.

<p>If the newsgroup is moderated, you can set this mailing list
up to be the moderation address for the newsgroup. By selecting
<em>Moderated</em>, an additional posting hold will be placed in
the approval process. All messages posted to the mailing list
will have to be approved before being sent on to the newsgroup,
or to the mailing list membership.

<p><em>Note that if the message has an <tt>Approved</tt> header
with the list's administrative password in it, this hold test
will be bypassed, allowing privileged posters to send messages
directly to the list and the newsgroup.</em>

<p>Finally, if the newsgroup is moderated, but you want to have
an open posting policy anyway, you should select <em>Open list,
moderated group</em>. The effect of this is to use the normal
Mailman moderation facilities, but to add an <tt>Approved</tt>
header to all messages that are gatewayed to Usenet.
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Located in Mailman/Gui/Usenet.py:68
1076.
Add members to a list from the command line.

Usage:
add_members [options] listname

Options:

--regular-members-file=file
-r file
A file containing addresses of the members to be added, one
address per line. This list of people become non-digest
members. If file is `-', read addresses from stdin. Note that
-n/--non-digest-members-file are deprecated synonyms for this option.

--digest-members-file=file
-d file
Similar to above, but these people become digest members.

--welcome-msg=<y|n>
-w <y|n>
Set whether or not to send the list members a welcome message,
overriding whatever the list's `send_welcome_msg' setting is.

--admin-notify=<y|n>
-a <y|n>
Set whether or not to send the list administrators a notification on
the success/failure of these subscriptions, overriding whatever the
list's `admin_notify_mchanges' setting is.

--help
-h
Print this help message and exit.

listname
The name of the Mailman list you are adding members to. It must
already exist.

You must supply at least one of -r and -d options. At most one of the
files can be `-'.
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(no translation yet)
Located in bin/add_members:26
1092.
Change a list's password.

Prior to Mailman 2.1, list passwords were kept in crypt'd format -- usually.
Some Python installations didn't have the crypt module available, so they'd
fall back to md5. Then suddenly the Python installation might grow a crypt
module and all list passwords would be broken.

In Mailman 2.1, all list and site passwords are stored in SHA1 hexdigest
form. This breaks list passwords for all existing pre-Mailman 2.1 lists, and
since those passwords aren't stored anywhere in plain text, they cannot be
retrieved and updated.

Thus, this script generates new passwords for a list, and optionally sends it
to all the owners of the list.

Usage: change_pw [options]

Options:

--all / -a
Change the password for all lists.

--domain=domain
-d domain
Change the password for all lists in the virtual domain `domain'. It
is okay to give multiple -d options.

--listname=listname
-l listname
Change the password only for the named list. It is okay to give
multiple -l options.

--password=newpassword
-p newpassword
Use the supplied plain text password `newpassword' as the new password
for any lists that are being changed (as specified by the -a, -d, and
-l options). If not given, lists will be assigned a randomly
generated new password.

--quiet / -q
Don't notify list owners of the new password. You'll have to have
some other way of letting the list owners know the new password
(presumably out-of-band).

--help / -h
Print this help message and exit.
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(no translation yet)
Located in bin/change_pw:20
1097.
The site administrator at %(hostname)s has changed the password for your
mailing list %(listname)s. It is now

%(notifypassword)s

Please be sure to use this for all future list administration. You may want
to log in now to your list and change the password to something more to your
liking. Visit your list admin page at

%(adminurl)s
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(no translation yet)
Translated by Samir Ribić on 2012-12-16
Reviewed by Samir Ribić on 2012-12-16
Located in bin/change_pw:191
1098.
Check a list's config database file for integrity.

All of the following files are checked:

config.pck
config.pck.last
config.db
config.db.last
config.safety

It's okay if any of these are missing. config.pck and config.pck.last are
pickled versions of the config database file for 2.1a3 and beyond. config.db
and config.db.last are used in all earlier versions, and these are Python
marshals. config.safety is a pickle written by 2.1a3 and beyond when the
primary config.pck file could not be read.

Usage: %(PROGRAM)s [options] [listname [listname ...]]

Options:

--all / -a
Check the databases for all lists. Otherwise only the lists named on
the command line are checked.

--verbose / -v
Verbose output. The state of every tested file is printed.
Otherwise only corrupt files are displayed.

--help / -h
Print this text and exit.
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(no translation yet)
Translated by Samir Ribić on 2012-12-16
Reviewed by Samir Ribić on 2012-12-16
Located in bin/check_db:19
1129.
Clean up an .mbox archive file.

The archiver looks for Unix-From lines separating messages in an mbox archive
file. For compatibility, it specifically looks for lines that start with
"From " -- i.e. the letters capital-F, lowercase-r, o, m, space, ignoring
everything else on the line.

Normally, any lines that start "From " in the body of a message should be
escaped such that a > character is actually the first on a line. It is
possible though that body lines are not actually escaped. This script
attempts to fix these by doing a stricter test of the Unix-From lines. Any
lines that start "From " but do not pass this stricter test are escaped with a
> character.

Usage: cleanarch [options] < inputfile > outputfile
Options:
-s n
--status=n
Print a # character every n lines processed

-q / --quiet
Don't print changed line information to standard error.

-n / --dry-run
Don't actually output anything.

-h / --help
Print this message and exit
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(no translation yet)
Translated by Samir Ribić on 2012-12-16
Reviewed by Samir Ribić on 2012-12-16
Located in bin/cleanarch:20
1133.
Clone a member address.

Cloning a member address means that a new member will be added who has all the
same options and passwords as the original member address. Note that this
operation is fairly trusting of the user who runs it -- it does no
verification to the new address, it does not send out a welcome message, etc.

The existing member's subscription is usually not modified in any way. If you
want to remove the old address, use the -r flag. If you also want to change
any list admin addresses, use the -a flag.

Usage:
clone_member [options] fromoldaddr tonewaddr

Where:

--listname=listname
-l listname
Check and modify only the named mailing lists. If -l is not given,
then all mailing lists are scanned from the address. Multiple -l
options can be supplied.

--remove
-r
Remove the old address from the mailing list after it's been cloned.

--admin
-a
Scan the list admin addresses for the old address, and clone or change
them too.

--quiet
-q
Do the modifications quietly.

--nomodify
-n
Print what would be done, but don't actually do it. Inhibits the
--quiet flag.

--help
-h
Print this help message and exit.

fromoldaddr (`from old address') is the old address of the user. tonewaddr
(`to new address') is the new address of the user.

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(no translation yet)
Located in bin/clone_member:19
1144.
Configure a list from a text file description.

Usage: config_list [options] listname

Options:
--inputfile filename
-i filename
Configure the list by assigning each module-global variable in the
file to an attribute on the list object, then saving the list. The
named file is loaded with execfile() and must be legal Python code.
Any variable that isn't already an attribute of the list object is
ignored (a warning message is printed). See also the -c option.

A special variable named `mlist' is put into the globals during the
execfile, which is bound to the actual MailList object. This lets you
do all manner of bizarre thing to the list object, but BEWARE! Using
this can severely (and possibly irreparably) damage your mailing list!

--outputfile filename
-o filename
Instead of configuring the list, print out a list's configuration
variables in a format suitable for input using this script. In this
way, you can easily capture the configuration settings for a
particular list and imprint those settings on another list. filename
is the file to output the settings to. If filename is `-', standard
out is used.

--checkonly
-c
With this option, the modified list is not actually changed. Only
useful with -i.

--verbose
-v
Print the name of each attribute as it is being changed. Only useful
with -i.

--help
-h
Print this help message and exit.

The options -o and -i are mutually exclusive.

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(no translation yet)
Located in bin/config_list:20
1156.
Convert a list's interpolation strings from %-strings to $-strings.

This script is intended to be run as a bin/withlist script, i.e.

% bin/withlist -l -r convert <mylist>
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(no translation yet)
Translated by Samir Ribić on 2012-12-16
Reviewed by Samir Ribić on 2012-12-16
Located in bin/convert.py:19
1120 of 51 results

This translation is managed by Ubuntu Bosnia and Herzegovina translators, assigned by Ubuntu Translators.

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Contributors to this translation: Arne Goetje, Muhamed Sosic, Samir Ribić, dzenana bricic, samra mrso.