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87.
Ubuntu is built on the foundation of Linux, which is a member of the \Index{Unix} family. \Index{Unix} is one of the oldest types of operating systems, and together with Linux has provided reliability and security for professional applications for almost half a century. Many servers around the world that store data for popular websites (such as YouTube and Google) run some variant of Linux or \Index{Unix}. The popular Android system for smartphones is a Linux variant; modern in-car computers usually run on Linux. Even Apple \acronym{OS X} is based on Unix. The Linux \Index{kernel} is best described as the core\dash almost the brain\dash of the Ubuntu operating system.
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Located in ./frontmatter/prologue.tex :75
91.
The early \acronym{GUI}s were difficult to configure, clunky, and generally only used by seasoned computer programmers. In the past decade, however, graphical user interfaces have grown in usability, reliability, and appearance. Ubuntu is one of many different Linux \emph{distributions}. \marginnote{To learn more about Linux distributions, see \chaplink{ch:learning-more}.}
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Located in ./frontmatter/prologue.tex :87
93.
New users to Ubuntu may find that it takes some time to feel comfortable when trying a new operating system. You will no doubt notice many similarities to both Microsoft Windows and Apple \acronym{OS X} as well as some differences. Users coming from Apple \acronym{OS X} are more likely to notice similarities due to the fact that both Apple \acronym{OS X} and Ubuntu originated from \Index{Unix}. The Unity shell, which is the default in Ubuntu, is a completely new concept, which needs some exploring to get used to it. See \chaplink{ch:the-ubuntu-desktop} for more information about the Unity shell.
type: document
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Located in ./frontmatter/prologue.tex :90
97.
[Many applications designed for Microsoft Windows or Apple \acronym{OS X} will not run on Ubuntu.] For the vast majority of everyday computing tasks, you will find suitable alternative applications available in Ubuntu. However, many professional applications (such as the Adobe Creative Suite) are not developed to work with Ubuntu. If you rely on commercial software that is not compatible with Ubuntu, yet still want to give Ubuntu a try, you may want to consider \gls{dual-booting}. \marginnote{To learn more about \gls{dual-booting} (running Ubuntu side-by-side with another operating system), see \chaplink{ch:installation}.} Alternatively, some applications developed for Windows will work in Ubuntu with a program called \application{Wine}. For more information on Wine, see \chaplink{ch:advanced-topics}.
type: description
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Located in ./frontmatter/prologue.tex :98
98.
[Many commercial games will not run on Ubuntu.] If you are a heavy gamer, then Ubuntu may not be for you. Game developers usually design games for the largest market. Since Ubuntu's market share is not as substantial as Microsoft's Windows or Apple's \acronym{OS X}, fewer game developers allocate resources towards making their games compatible with Linux. \marginnote{See \chaplink{ch:software-management} to learn more about \application{Ubuntu Software Center}.} If you just enjoy a game every now and then, there are many high quality games that can be easily installed through the \application{Ubuntu Software Center}. There are also a lot of games available at \url{http://store.steampowered.com/browse/linux/}.
type: description
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Located in ./frontmatter/prologue.tex :98
153.
\marginnote{While the 64-bit version of Ubuntu is referred to as the ``AMD64'' version, it will work on Intel, AMD, and other compatible 64-bit processors.} Once your download is complete, you will be left with a file called \emph{ubuntu-14.04-desktop-i386.iso} or similar (\emph{i386} here in the filename refers to the 32-bit version. If you downloaded the 64-bit version, the filename contains \emph{amd64} instead). This file is a \acronym{DVD} image\dash a snapshot of the contents of a \acronym{DVD}\dash which you will need to burn to a \acronym{DVD}.
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Located in ./installation/installation.tex :65
166.
\marginnote{Alternatively, you can also use your mouse to double-click the ``Install Ubuntu 14.04'' icon that is visible on the desktop when using the Live \acronym{DVD}. This will start the Ubuntu installer.} When you are finished exploring, restart your computer by clicking the ``Power'' button in the top right corner of your screen (a circle with a line through the top) and then select \menu{Restart.} Follow the prompts that appear on screen, including removing the Live \acronym{DVD} and pressing \keystroke{Enter} when instructed, and then your computer will restart. As long as the Live \acronym{DVD} is no longer in the drive, your computer will return to its original state as though nothing ever happened!
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Located in ./installation/installation.tex :93
183.
Upgrade Ubuntu \ldots\ to 14.04
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Located in ./installation/installation.tex :126 ./installation/installation.tex :136
228.
Ubuntu will now finish installing on your hard drive. As the installation progresses, a slideshow will give you an introduction to some of the default applications included with Ubuntu. These applications are covered in more detail in \chaplink{ch:default-applications}. The slideshow will also highlight the Ubuntu support options.
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Located in ./installation/installation.tex :214
239.
Initially, you may notice many similarities between Ubuntu and other operating systems, such as Microsoft Windows or Apple \acronym{OS X}. This is because they are all based on the concept of a graphical user interface (\gls{GUI})\dash \ie, you use your mouse to navigate the desktop, open applications, move files, and perform most other tasks. In short, things are visually-oriented. This chapter is designed to help you become familiar with various applications and menus in Ubuntu so that you become confident in using the Ubuntu \acronym{GUI}.
type: document
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/understanding-the-ubuntu-desktop.tex :14
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Contributors to this translation: Bert de Bruijn, CeesSluis, Daan Middendorp, Daniël H., Emiel Beinema, Erik, Gwijde, Hannie Dumoleyn, Hannie Dumoleyn, Jan Reitsma, Jasper van Zijp, Jeroen, Jeroen Baten, Jochem, Justin, Kenneth Venken, Letatcest, Luc van der Zandt, Mark Van den Borre, Noah Pluimers, Redmar, Ruben Verweij, StevenA, Theo ter Horst, Thomas van der Burgt, Ubuntu4life, UndiFineD, cumulus007, rob, vanadium, willem van gansen.