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266.
The vertical bar of icons on the left side of the desktop is called the Launcher. The Launcher provides easy access to applications, mounted devices, and the \menu{Trash}. All running applications on your system will place an icon in the Launcher while the application is running. To change the Launcher icon size, go to \menu{Session Indicator \then System Settings \then Appearance}, tab \tab{Look}.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/using-the-launcher.tex :11
267.
The Ubuntu Launcher on the left with a sample of applications on it.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/using-the-launcher.tex :14
288.
Lenses act as specialized search categories in the Dash: searching is accomplished by utilizing one or more lenses, also known as scopes, and each lens is responsible for providing a category of search results through the Dash.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/the-dash.tex :25
289.
The seven lenses installed by default at the bottom are: links to your \lens{Home} lens (\lensicon{home}), \lens{Applications} lens (\lensicon{app}), \lens{Files and Folders} lens (\lensicon{file}), \lens{Music} lens (\lensicon{music}), \lens{Photo} lens (\lensicon{photo}), \lens{Videos} lens (\lensicon{video}), and \lens{Social network messages} lens (\lensicon{gwibber}).
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/the-dash.tex :25
296.
A standard Ubuntu installation comes with many applications. Users can additionally download thousands of applications from the \application{Ubuntu Software Center}. \marginnote{Ubuntu Software Center and software management will be discussed in detail at \chaplink{ch:software-management}.} As you collect an arsenal of awesome applications (and get a bonus point for alliteration!), it may become difficult to remember the name of a particular application; the \lens{Applications} lens on the Dash can assist with this search. This lens will automatically categorize installed applications under ``Recently Used,'' ``Installed,'' or ``More Suggestions.'' \marginnote{If you are new to the world of Ubuntu, be sure to read the \chaplink{ch:default-applications}. It will provide you with assistance in choosing application(s) to suit your needs.} You can also enter the name of an application (or a part of it) into the search bar in the Dash, and the names of applications matching your search criteria will appear. Even if you don't remember the name of the application at all, type a keyword that is relevant to that application, and the Dash will find it. For example, type \userinput{music}, and the Dash will show you the default music player and any music player you've used.
type: document
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/the-dash.tex :42
304.
The workspaces feature is not activated by default in Ubuntu. To activate workspaces, click on \menu{Session Indicator \then System Settings\ldots \then Appearance} then click on the \menu{Behavior} tab and click on the \menu{Enable workspaces} box. When this box is checked, you'll notice that another icon is added to the bottom of the Launcher that looks like a window pane. This is the \application{workspace switcher}.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/workspaces.tex :15
307.
If you've activated the \application{workspace switcher} as described above, you can switch between workspaces by clicking on the \application{workspace switcher} icon located on the Launcher. This utility allows you to toggle through the workspaces (whether they contain open applications or not) and choose the one you want to use. You can also launch the workspace \underline{s}witcher by typing \keystroke{Super+s} and choose a workspace by using the keyboard \keystroke{arrow}s followed by \keystroke{RET} (the \keystroke{Return} / \keystroke{Enter} key).
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/workspaces.tex :18
310.
When opening a program in Ubuntu (such as a web browser or a text editor\dash see \chaplink{ch:default-applications} for more information on using applications)\dash a \emph{window} will appear on your desktop. Simply stated, a window is the box that appears on your screen when you start a program. In Ubuntu, the top part of a window (the \emph{title bar}) will have the name of the application to the left (most often, the title will be the same as the application's name). A window will also have three buttons in the top-left corner. From left to right, these buttons represent \emph{close} window, \emph{minimize} window, and \emph{maximize} window. Other window management options are available by right-clicking anywhere on the title bar.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/managing-windows.tex :16
316.
This is the top bar of a window, named \emph{title bar}. The close, minimize, and maximize buttons are in the top-left corner of the window.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/managing-windows.tex :22
317.
The button immediately to the right of the close button is the \gls{minimize} button (\minimizebutton{}) which hides the window from view and minimizes it to the Launcher. When an application is minimized to the Launcher, the left-side of the icon in the Launcher will display an additional triangle. Clicking the icon of the minimized application will restore the window to its original position.
type: document
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/managing-windows.tex :21
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Contributors to this translation: @l3x1k0, Anestis, Emmanuel Ninos, Filippos Kolyvas, George Alexandridis, George Christofis, George Fragos, George Kontis, Jennie Petoumenou, John Pag, John Xygonakis, Konstantinos Kouratoras, Kostas Boukouvalas, Kostas Milonas, Kostas Zigourakis, L4Linux, Mixalis Zisis, N1ck 7h0m4d4k15, Nikos Papagiannopoulos, Radwan, Reinach, Silent Knight, Simos Xenitellis , Zoi Gialitaki, abuda, adem, mangelasakis, mara sdr, topografos, tzem.