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274.
The top bar incorporates common functions used in Ubuntu 12.04. The \marginnote{The top bar is also referred as the top panel.} right part of the bar is called the \emph{indicator area}. Each installation of Ubuntu may contain slightly different types and quantities of icons based on a number of factors, including type of hardware and available on-board accessories. The most common indicators are (starting from the left): \marginnote{For more about: \begin{itemize} \item the \application{Messaging Indicator} see \seclink{sec:micro-blogging}; \item the \application{Network Indicator} see \seclink{sec:getting-online}; \item the \application{Session Indicator} see \seclink{sec:session-options}. \end{itemize}} \begin{description} \item[Keyboard indicator] allows you to select the keyboard layout you would like and change your keyboard preferences. \marginnote{The \emph{keyboard indicator} only shows when you have chosen more than one keyboard layout in the keyboard settings during installation.} \item[Messaging indicator] incorporates all your \emph{social applications}. From here, you can access your instant messenger, your email client, your microblogging application, and even \application{UbuntuOne}, your personal cloud! \item[Network indicator] allows you to manage your network connections and connect quickly and easily to a wired or wireless network. \item[Sound indicator] provides an easy way to adjust the sound volume as well as access your music player and sound settings. \item[Clock] displays the current time and provides an easy way to access your calendar and \emph{Time and Date settings}. \item[User menu] allows you to easily switch between different users and access your online and user \emph{accounts}. \item[Session indicator] provides an easy way to access \emph{System Settings}, \emph{Updates}, Printers, and session options for locking your computer, logging out of your session, restarting the computer, or shutting down completely.
type: document
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :56
306.
When opening a program in Ubuntu (such as a web browser or a text editor\dash see \chaplink{ch:default-applications} for more information on using applications)\dash a \emph{window} will appear on your desktop. The windows in Ubuntu are very similar to those in Microsoft Windows or Mac \acronym{OS~X}. Simply stated, a window is the box that appears on your screen when you start a program. In Ubuntu, the top part of a window (the \emph{titlebar}) will have the title of the window centered (most often, the title will be the name of the application). A window will also have three buttons in the top-left corner. From left to right, these buttons represent \emph{close}, \emph{minimize} window, and \emph{maximize} window. Other window management options are available by right-clicking anywhere on the title bar.
type: document
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :131
311.
\screenshot{02-window-buttons.png}{ss:window-buttons}{This is the top bar of a window, named \emph{Titlebar}. The close, minimize, and maximize buttons are on the top-left corner of window.} To close a window, click on the \closebutton{} in the upper-left corner of the window\dash the first button on the left-hand side. The button immediately to the right of the \closebutton{} is the \gls{minimize} button (\minimizebutton) which removes the window from the visible screen and places it in the Launcher. This button doesn't close the application, it just hides the application from view. When an application is minimized to the Launcher, the left-side of the icon in the Launcher will display a triangle showing you the application is still running. Clicking the icon of the application that is minimized will restore the window to its original position. Finally, the right-most button (\maximizebutton) is the \gls{maximize} button, which makes the application window fill the entire screen. Clicking the \gls{maximize} button again will return the window to its original size. If a windows is maximized, its top-left buttons and menu are automatically hidden from view. To make them appear, just move your mouse to the left side of the top bar. \subsection{Moving and resizing windows} \index{windows!moving} \index{windows!resizing} \marginnote{You can also move a window by holding the \keystroke{Alt} key and dragging the window.} To move a window around the workspace, place the mouse pointer over the window's title bar, then click and drag the window while continuing to hold down the left mouse button. To resize a window, place the pointer on an edge or corner of the window so that the pointer turns into a larger, two-sided arrow, (known as the resize icon). You can then click and drag to resize the window. \screenshot{02-workspaces-lens.png}{ss:workspaces}{The \emph{Workspaces Switcher} on the Launcher.}
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :146
326.
At times, you may want to have a \emph{window always on top} so that it can be seen or monitored while you work with other applications. For example, you may want to browse the web and, at the same time, view and answer to any incoming instant message. To keep a window on top, right-click on the window's title bar, then select \dropdown{Always on the top}. Note that this window will be on the top of all windows that are opened in the current workspace. If you want to have a window always on the top regardless of the workspace, right-click on the window's titlebar, then select \dropdown{Always on Visible Workspace}. This window will now be on top of all other windows across all workspaces.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :173
332.
To access \menu{Places}, move your mouse over the top bar and select \menu{Places}. \marginnote{If you do not see the desktop menu, click somewhere on the desktop and it will appear.} The \menu{Places} menu holds a list of commonly used folders (such as \menu{Documents}, \menu{Music}, \menu{Downloads}, and the \menu{Home Folder}). You can also browse the files on your computer by clicking \dropdown{Computer} in this menu. If you set up a home network, you will find a menu item to access shared files or folders. You can also access the \dropdown{Search for Files} tool from the \menu{Places} menu, or browse a list of recently opened folders.
type: document
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :183
335.
The home folder is used to store your personal files. Your home folder matches your login name. When you open your personal folder, you will see there are several more folders inside, including: Desktop (which contains any files that are visible on the desktop), Documents, Downloads, Music, Pictures, Public, Templates, and Videos. These are created automatically the installation process. You can add more files and folders as needed.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :189
344.
[Toolbar] The toolbar contains tools for navigation as well as resizing the window. A drop-down list gives you the option of switching the view from \menu{Icon View} to \menu{List View} or \menu{Compact View}. The search icon (which looks like a magnifying glass) opens a field so you can search for a file by name. \marginnote{If you start typing a location in the toolbar starting with a / character, \application{Nautilus} will automatically change the navigation buttons into a text field labeled \emph{Location}. It is also possible to convert the navigation buttons into a text field by pressing \keystroke{Ctrl+L}.} Just below the toolbar, you will see a representation of your current browsing. This is similar to the history function in most browsers; it keeps track of where you are and allows you to backtrack if necessary. You can click on the locations to navigate back through the file browser.
type: description
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :208
378.
\screenshot{02-SystemSettings.png}{ss:System Settings}{You can change most of your system's settings here.} One of the advantages to a windowed environment through \application{Unity} is the ability to change the look and feel of your desktop. Don't like the default charcoal Ubuntu theme? Do you have a picture of your third cousin's aunt's uncle's nephew's pet chihuahua that you'd love to see on your desktop as wallpaper? All of this (and more) is possible through desktop customizations in \application{Unity}. Most customizations can be reached via the \application{Session Indicator} and then selecting \menu{System Settings} to open the \application{System Settings} application window. The Dash, desktop appearance, themes, wallpapers, accessibility, and other configuration settings are available here. For more information see \seclink{sec:session-options}.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :281
393.
\application{Orca} is a useful tool for people with visual impairments. \application{Orca} comes preinstalled in Ubuntu. To run \application{Orca}, click on the Dash and type \userinput{Orca}, and click on the displayed result. \application{Orca} is the ''Screen Reader'' part of \application{Universal Access} and can be launched once the ``Screen Reader'' is activated. Orca's voice synthesizer will activate and assist you through the various options such as voice type, voice language, Braille, and screen magnification. Once you have finished selecting your settings, you will need to log out of the computer (\application{Orca} will offer to do this for you). When you log back in, the \application{Orca} settings you selected will automatically run every time you use your computer.
type: document
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :309
410.
\marginnote{You can lock your screen quickly by using the keyboard shortcut \keystroke{Ctrl+Alt+L}. Locking your screen is recommended if you move away from your computer for a short amount of time.} From the Session Indicator, you can also select \menu{Lock Screen} to require a password before using the computer again \dash this is useful if you need to leave your computer for some duration. You can also use the \menu{Session Indicator} to set up a guest session for a friend, or to \emph{switch users} to log into another user account without closing your applications.
type: document
(no translation yet)
Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :341
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