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268.
\marginnote{To read more about other variants of Ubuntu, refer to \chaplink{ch:learning-more}.} In Linux distributions (such as Ubuntu), there are a number of desktop environments available. Ubuntu uses \application{Unity} as the default desktop environment. After installing and logging in to Ubuntu, you will see the \application{Unity} desktop. This initial view is comprised of the \seclink{sec:desktop-background} and two \emph{bars}\dash one is horizontally located at the top of your desktop and appropriately named \seclink{sec:top-bar}, and the other bar is vertically oriented at the far left, called \menu{the Launcher}.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :31
271.
Below the top bar is an image that covers the entire desktop. This is the default desktop background, or wallpaper, belonging to the default Ubuntu 12.10 theme known as \emph{Ambiance.} To learn more about customizing your desktop (including changing your background), see the section on \seclink{sec:customizing-desktop} below.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :35
273.
desktop!top bar
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :56
274.
The top bar incorporates common functions used in Ubuntu 12.04. The \marginnote{The top bar is also referred as the top panel.} right part of the bar is called the \emph{indicator area}. Each installation of Ubuntu may contain slightly different types and quantities of icons based on a number of factors, including type of hardware and available on-board accessories. The most common indicators are (starting from the left): \marginnote{For more about: \begin{itemize} \item the \application{Messaging Indicator} see \seclink{sec:micro-blogging}; \item the \application{Network Indicator} see \seclink{sec:getting-online}; \item the \application{Session Indicator} see \seclink{sec:session-options}. \end{itemize}} \begin{description} \item[Keyboard indicator] allows you to select the keyboard layout you would like and change your keyboard preferences. \marginnote{The \emph{keyboard indicator} only shows when you have chosen more than one keyboard layout in the keyboard settings during installation.} \item[Messaging indicator] incorporates all your \emph{social applications}. From here, you can access your instant messenger, your email client, your microblogging application, and even \application{UbuntuOne}, your personal cloud! \item[Network indicator] allows you to manage your network connections and connect quickly and easily to a wired or wireless network. \item[Sound indicator] provides an easy way to adjust the sound volume as well as access your music player and sound settings. \item[Clock] displays the current time and provides an easy way to access your calendar and \emph{Time and Date settings}. \item[User menu] allows you to easily switch between different users and access your online and user \emph{accounts}. \item[Session indicator] provides an easy way to access \emph{System Settings}, \emph{Updates}, Printers, and session options for locking your computer, logging out of your session, restarting the computer, or shutting down completely.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :56
275.
\screenshot{02-indicators.png}{ss:indicators}{The Indicators of the top bar.} Every application has a menu (like \menu{File}, \menu{Edit}, \menu{View}, etc.). In \application{Unity}, the \emph{application menu} isn't on the titlebar of the application as is commonly the case with other \acronym{GUI} environments. Instead, it is located on the left area of the top bar. To show an application's menu, just move your mouse to the top bar. This capability of \application{Unity} to only show the application's menu when needed is especially beneficial for netbook and laptop users as it provides you with more free work space. \marginnote{Note that some older applications may still display their menu within the application window.}
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :60
277.
\screenshot{02-Launcher.png}{ss:Launcher}{The Ubuntu 12.04 Launcher Panel on the left with a sample of applications on it.} \index{Launcher} The vertical bar of icons on the left side of the screen is called the Launcher. The Launcher provides easy access to applications, mounted devices, and the \menu{Trash}. All running applications on your system will place an icon in this Launcher while the application is running. The first icon at the top of the Launcher is the Dash, a major innovation and core element of \application{Unity} \dash we will explore the Dash in a later section of this chapter. By default, other applications appear on the Launcher, including applications such as \application{LibreOffice} and \application{Firefox}, the \menu{Workspace} lens, any mounted devices, and, of course, the always-important \menu{Trash} lens at the bottom of the Launcher. \marginnote{\menu{Workspaces} helps you to select the workspace or the window you want. \menu{Trash} contains deleted files.} \marginnote{Tip: Pressing \keystroke{Super+S} will show the \application{Workspaces}.}
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :68
282.
\marginnote{If you hold the Super key, a number will appear on each of the first ten applications, along with a margin containing useful shortcuts. You can launch an application with a number $n$ on it by typing \keystroke{Super+$n$}.} To run an application from the Launcher (or cause an already-running application to appear), just click on the application's icon. Running applications will have one or more triangles on the left side of its icon, indicating the number of application windows open for this application. The application in the foreground (meaning on top of all other open application windows) has a white triangle on the right side of its icon. You can also run an application through the Dash. We will talk about the Dash, in the \seclink{sec:dash} section. \marginscreenshot{02-Launcher-triangles.png}{ss:Launcher-items}{Just below the Home Folder icon, you will see the Firefox icon. Notice the triangle on the right side indicating it is the application in the foreground (on top of all other applications), and the triangle on the left side indicating there's only one window associated with Firefox at this time.}
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :77
287.
Run the application you want to add to the Launcher, right-click on the application's icon on the Launcher, and select \dropdown{Keep in the Launcher}.
type: itemize
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :87
288.
To remove an application from the Launcher, right-click on the application's icon, then select \dropdown{Remove from the Launcher} or deselect \dropdown{Keep in the Launcher} \dash if the application is running.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :89
291.
\marginnote{The Dash allows you to search for information, both locally (installed applications, recent files, bookmarks, etc.) as well as remotely (Twitter, Google Docs, etc.). This is accomplished by utilizing one or more lenses, each responsible for providing a category of search results for the Dash. For more information about the Dash and its lens, see: \url{https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Unity}} The Dash is a tool to help you access and find applications and files on your computer quickly. If you are a Windows user, you'll find the Dash to be a more advanced \emph{Start Menu}. If you are a Mac user, the Dash is similar to \application{Launchpad} in the dock. If you've used a previous version of Ubuntu or another \acronym{GNOME} Linux distribution, the Dash replaces the \acronym{GNOME 2} menus. To explore the Dash, click on the top-most icon on the Launcher; the icon has the Ubuntu logo on it. \screenshot{02-dash-home.png}{ss:dash-home}{The Dash} After selecting the Dash icon, another window will appear with a search bar on the top as well as grouping of recently accessed applications, files, and downloads. The search bar provides dynamic results as you enter your search terms. The five lenses at the bottom are links to your \emph{Home} lens, \emph{Applications} lens, \emph{Files} lens, and \emph{Music} and \emph{Videos} lenses. Lenses act as specialized search categories in the Dash.
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :99
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