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276.
\textit{Additional Navigation Tools:} \marginnote{If you start typing a location starting with a / character, \application{Nautilus} will automatically change the navigation buttons into a text field labeled \emph{Location}. It is also possible to convert the navigation buttons into a text field by pressing \keystroke{Ctrl+L}.} Just below the toolbar, you will see a representation of where you are currently browsing. This is similar to the history function of most browsers; it keeps track of where you are and allows you to backtrack if necessary. You can click on the locations to navigate back through the file browser.
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Located in ./around-desktop/around-desktop.tex :218
285.
\marginnote{Note that you can easily view hidden files by clicking \menu{View \then Show Hidden Files}, or alternatively by pressing \keystroke{Ctrl+H}. Hiding files with a dot (.) is \textbf{not} a security measure\dash instead it provides a way of keeping your folders organized and tidy.} To create a new folder from within \application{Nautilus} click \menu{File \then Create Folder}, then name the folder that appears by replacing the default ``untitled folder'' with your desired label (\eg, ``Personal Finances''). You can also create a new folder by pressing \keystroke{Ctrl+Shift+N}, or by right-clicking in the file browser window and selecting \button{Create Folder} from the popup menu (this action will also work on the desktop). If you wish to hide certain folders or files, place a dot (.) in front of the name (\ie, ``.Personal Finances''). In some cases it impossible to hide files and folders, without prefixing them with a dot. In Nautilus these folders can be hidden by creating a .hidden file. Open the file and type in the name of the file(s) or folder(s) you wish to hide. Make sure that each file or folder is on a separate line. When you open Nautilus the folder will no longer be visible.
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Located in ./around-desktop/around-desktop.tex :237
287.
\marginnote{You can also use the keyboard shortcuts \keystroke{Ctrl+X}, \keystroke{Ctrl+C} and \keystroke{Ctrl+V} to cut, copy and paste (respectively) files and folders.} You can copy files or folders in \application{Nautilus} by clicking \menu{Edit\then Copy}, or by right-clicking on the item and selecting \button{Copy} from the popup menu. When using the \button{Edit} menu in \application{Nautilus}, make sure you've selected the file or folder you want to copy first (by left-clicking on it once).
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Located in ./ubuntu-desktop/ubuntu-desktop.tex :279
290.
To move a file or folder, select the item you want to move then click \menu{Edit \then Cut}. Navigate to your desired location, then click \menu{Edit \then Paste}. \marginnote{In the Nautilus \button{Edit} menu, you will also find the \button{Copy To} and \button{Move To} buttons. These can be used to copy or move items to common locations, and can be useful if you are using \textbf{panes} (see below). Note that it is unnecessary to use \button{Paste} when using these options.} As with the copy command above, you can also perform this action using the right-click menu, and it will work for multiple files or folders at once. An alternative way to move a file or folder is to click on the item, and then drag it to the new location.
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Located in ./around-desktop/around-desktop.tex :263
293.
Opening multiple \application{Nautilus} windows can be useful for dragging files and folders between locations. The option of \emph{tabs} is also available in \application{Nautilus}, as well as the use of \emph{panes}. \marginnote{When dragging items between \application{Nautilus} windows, tabs or panes, a small symbol will appear over the mouse cursor to let you know which action will be performed when you release the mouse button. A plus sign (+) indicates you are about to copy the item, whereas a small arrow means the item will be moved. The default action will depend on the locations you are using.} When browsing a folder in \application{Nautilus}, to open a second window select \menu{File \then New Window} or press \keystroke{Ctrl+N}. This will open a new window, allowing you to drag files and folders between two locations. To open a new tab, click \menu{File \then New Tab} or press \keystroke{Ctrl+T}. A new row will appear above the space used for browsing your files containing two tabs\dash both will display the directory you were originally browsing. You can click these tabs to switch between them, and click and drag files or folders between tabs the same as you would between windows. You can also open a second pane in Nautilus so you can see two locations at once without having to switch between tabs or windows. To open a second pane, click \menu{View \then Extra Pane}, or press \keystroke{F3} on your keyboard. Again, dragging files and folders between panes is a quick way to move or copy items.
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Located in ./around-desktop/around-desktop.tex :274
302.
An alternative way of hiding the panel is to do so manually. Clicking on \button{Show hide buttons} will add a button to each side of the panel that can be used to hide it from view. By default these buttons will display directional arrows; however, you can select the \button{Arrows on hide buttons} option to remove the arrows and just have plain buttons. Clicking one of these \emph{hide buttons} on the panel will slide it across the screen and out of view, leaving just the opposite hide button in sight which you can click to bring it back. \marginnote{By default, Ubuntu requires that you maintain at least one panel on the desktop. If you prefer a Microsoft Windows feel, a panel at the bottom of the desktop can be set to start programs as well as select between open windows. Alternatively, if you prefer a Mac \acronym{OS~X} look you can keep a panel at the top and add an applications dock such as \application{Docky}, \application{Avant Window Navigator} (\acronym{AWN}), or \application{Cairo-Dock}. These are all available in the \application{Ubuntu Software Center}, which is discussed further in \chaplink{ch:software-management}.} The \button{Background} tab in the \window{Panel Properties} window allows you to change the appearance of the panel. By default, this is set to \button{None (use system theme)}, meaning that your desktop theme will dictate the appearance of the panel (we will look at how to change your desktop theme below). If you prefer, you can choose your own panel color by selecting the \button{Solid color} button, then opening the color select window. You can also set the panel transparency using the slider. Alternatively, you can click the \button{Background image} button if you have an image or pattern stored on your computer that you would like to use as your panel background. Use the file selector to locate the background image in your computer, then click \button{Open} to apply the change.
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Located in ./around-desktop/around-desktop.tex :285
318.
\marginnote{You can also change the background by right-clicking on the desktop and selecting \button{Change Desktop Background} from the pop-up menu.} Click the \button{Background} tab in the Appearance Preferences window to change the desktop background. Here you will see Ubuntu's default selection of backgrounds. To change the background simply click the picture you would like to use. You're not limited to this selection though. To use one of your own pictures, click the \button{Add\ldots} button, and navigate to the image you want. Double-click it, and the change will take effect immediately. This image will also then be added to your list of available backgrounds.
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Located in ./around-desktop/around-desktop.tex :339
353.
This margin note is confusing to me - are you saying that to connect to a network (\ie, access files from my home computer with my laptop) I do the same thing as connecting to the Internet? This is not the case and will probably confuse people so have removed it for now. \marginnote{In this guide we will limit our discussion to connecting to the Internet. However, connecting to a home or office network is usually performed in a similar manner.}
type: comment
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Located in ./working-with-ubuntu/gettingonline.tex :9
368.
\gltodo{``\acronym{DHCP},'' ``\acronym{ISP}''} \marginnote{Are you already online? If the NetworkManager icon in the top panel shows a connection, then you may have successfully connected during the installation process. If so, you do not need to follow the rest of this section.} In order to connect with a wired connection, you need to know whether your network connection supports \gls{DHCP}. This stands for ``Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol,'' and is a way for computers on your network to automatically receive configuration information from your Internet service provider (\gls{ISP}). This is usually the quickest and easiest way of establishing a connection between your computer and your \acronym{ISP} in order to access the Internet, although some \acronym{ISP}s may provide what is called a \emph{static address} instead. If you are unsure whether your \acronym{ISP} supports \acronym{DHCP}, you may wish to contact their customer service line to check. They will also be able to provide you with information on your static address if one has been allocated to you (in many cases \acronym{ISP}s only allocate static addresses to customers upon request).
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Located in ./default-apps/gettingonline.tex :58
370.
If your network supports \acronym{DHCP}, you may already be set up for online access. To check this, click on the NetworkManager icon. There should be a ``Wired Network'' heading in the menu that is displayed. If ``Auto eth$0$'' appears directly underneath, then your computer is currently connected and probably already set up correctly for \acronym{DHCP}. If ``disconnected'' appears in gray underneath the wired network section, look below to see if an option labeled ``Auto eth$0$'' appears in the list. If so, click on it to attempt to establish a wired connection.
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Located in ./working-with-ubuntu/gettingonline.tex :61
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