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11.
\newglossaryentry{GUI}{name={\acronym{GUI}}, description={The \acronym{GUI} (which stands for Graphical User Interface) is a type of user interface that allows humans to interact with the computer using graphics and images rather than just text.}}
type: Plain text
\newglossaryentry{GUI}{name={\acronym{GUI}}, description={\acronym{GUI} (אשר הנם ראשי התיבות של Graphical User Interface) הוא מנשק משתמש המאפשר לבני־אדם ליצור אינטרקציה תוך שימוש בגראפיקה ותמונות ולא רק טקסט.}}
Translated and reviewed by Ddorda on 2010-04-04
Located in ./frontmatter/glossary-entries.tex :64
131.
Next, you need to tell Ubuntu what keyboard you are using. Usually, you will find the suggested option is satisfactory. If you are unsure, you can click the \button{Guess} button to have Ubuntu work out the correct choice by asking you to press a series of keys. You can also choose your own keyboard layout from the list. If you like, type something into the box at the bottom to make sure you are happy with your selection, then click \button{Forward} to continue.
type: document
(no translation yet)
Translated and reviewed by The Ubuntu IL Spreaders on 2010-04-04
Located in ./installation/installation.tex :89
144.
\marginnote{Ubuntu installs a \textbf{home folder} where your personal files and configuration data are located by default. If you choose to have your home folder on a separate partition, then in the event that you decide to reinstall Ubuntu or perform a fresh upgrade to the latest release, your personal files and configuration data won't be lost.}
type: document
(no translation yet)
Translated and reviewed by The Ubuntu IL Spreaders on 2010-04-04
Located in ./installation/installation.tex :121
158.
Now you need to decide on your computer's name. Again, this will be filled in for you automatically using the login name you entered above (it will say something like ``john-desktop'' or ``john-laptop.''), however, it can be changed if you prefer. Your computer name will mainly be used for identifying your computer if you are on a home or office network with multiple other computers. To learn more about setting up a network, refer to \chaplink{ch:default-applications}.
(no translation yet)
Translated and reviewed by The Ubuntu IL Spreaders on 2010-04-04
161.
Ubuntu will log in to your primary account automatically when you start up the computer so you won't have to enter your username and password. This makes your login experience quicker and more convenient, however, if privacy or security are important to you, this option is not recommended. Anyone who can physically access your computer will be able to turn it on and also access your files.
type: document
(no translation yet)
Translated and reviewed by The Ubuntu IL Spreaders on 2010-04-04
Located in ./installation/installation.tex :154
165.
This option provides you with an extra layer of security. Your home folder is where your personal files are stored. By selecting this option, Ubuntu will automatically enable encryption on your home folder, meaning that files and folders must be \emph{decrypted} using your password before they can be accessed. Therefore if someone had physical access to your hard drive (for example, if your computer was stolen and the hard drive removed), they would still not be able to see your files without knowing your password. \warning{If you choose this option, be careful not to enable automatic login at a later date. It will cause complications with your encrypted home folder, and will potentially lock you out of important files.}
type: document
(no translation yet)
Translated and reviewed by The Ubuntu IL Spreaders on 2010-04-04
Located in ./installation/installation.tex :163
178.
At first glance, you will notice many similarities between Ubuntu and other operating systems such as Windows or Mac \acronym{OS~X}. This is because they are all based on the concept of a graphical user interface (\gls{GUI})\dash that is, you use your mouse to navigate the desktop, open programs, move files, and perform most other tasks. In short, things are very visually oriented, which means it is important for you to become familiar with where and what to click in Ubuntu.
type: document
(no translation yet)
Translated and reviewed by The Ubuntu IL Spreaders on 2010-04-04
Located in ./around-desktop/around-desktop.tex :8
192.
\marginnote{To remove an applet, right click on it and select \button{Remove From Panel.}}
type: document
(no translation yet)
Translated and reviewed by The Ubuntu IL Spreaders on 2010-04-04
Located in ./around-desktop/around-desktop.tex :35
194.
\marginnote{To add a new applet to a panel, right click in a clear area on the panel and select \button{Add to Panel.}}
type: document
(no translation yet)
Translated and reviewed by The Ubuntu IL Spreaders on 2010-04-04
Located in ./around-desktop/around-desktop.tex :39
365.
To check if you are online, right-click on the NetworkManager icon in the top panel and select the \menu{Connection Information} option.
type: document
(no translation yet)
Translated and reviewed by The Ubuntu IL Spreaders on 2010-04-04
Located in ./default-apps/gettingonline.tex :64
110 of 23 results

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Contributors to this translation: Amir Eldor, Arkashkin, Ddorda, Liel Fridman, Netanel Shine, Ohad Abarbanel, Oz Elhassid, The Ubuntu IL Spreaders, Yaron, hatul, mickey946, moshenahmias, serfus, shimi810, shualdon, tzachi portal, yoav danieli.